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How to Choose Shutter Hardware

The appearance of shutters and their impact on the home’s aesthetics’ not only depends on the style and color, but also how they’re installed and what type of hardware is chosen. Hardware is a small detail—but one that can have a dramatic influence on the home’s authenticity.  

Atlantic Premium Shutters offers many choices of architecturally correct and historically accurate hardware options in a range of styles and installation methods. But choosing the right options is about more than just what looks best on the shelf.

Here are a few strategies to keep in mind when choosing hardware for shutters.

• Seek guidance: Choosing the right hardware for custom shutters requires some basic expertise—and even a bit of math. When in doubt, talk to an experienced dealer or the manufacturer’s representative. They can provide advice on the proper hinge and pintel offsetsfor your shutters and the home to ensure you get the look you’re striving for.

• Consider the home’s age: If the home is older or the style is vintage, select hardware that contributes to an authentic look. For example, a slide bolt can help keep shutters closed while adding an old-timey appearance. Visible S holdbacks and rat-tail holdbacks also add a historic vibe. In addition, older homes typically have shutters that sit back at an angle in the open position, whereas shutters for today’s homes tend to lie flat, so consider how different offsets of the hinge and the pintel will impact the way the shutter sits.

• Take cladding into account: Shutters will sit differently on different types of cladding, both in material and style, because it impacts how the window is installed. Brick homes, for example, will require hardware attachment to the brickmold and allow the shutter to close into the recess of the window and when open to lay outside on the brick. Hardware also is available to accommodate lap siding and trim board, among other styles and materials.

• Account for shutter thickness: The thickness of the shutter will impact which offsets are needed for proper operation. The thickness must be considered when choosing hardware to ensure the shutter closes properly. Your dealer can assist with calculating the thickness of the shutter in relation to the pintel and the hinge. Bring pictures of the exterior so they can account for brickmold and window trim.

• Consider visibility: Determine if you want visible hardware from the front or back. For front-exposed hardware, for example, a strap hinge will look more appealing than an L hinge, especially if the shutter has three hinges; if exposed to the rear, hinge style is less important.

• Consider adding acorn holdbacks: For tall shutters (such as those 5 feet and above), decorative holdbacks, such as an S holdback, sit low on the shutter and do not hold the top of the shutter. This one holdback may not be strong enough to prevent vibration in wind. Adding acorn holdbacks behind the shutter can help anchor the shutter to prevent movement and potential scratching while retaining the look of the S holdback on the front.

• Conduct occasional maintenance: Made of 304 stainless steel, Atlantic shutter hardware doesn’t need much maintenance, but can be cleaned of pollen and dust when necessary. Clean with mild soapy water and a soft cloth, not with a heavy bristle brush.

Get inspired to achieve the perfect look by browsing Atlantic Premium Shutters’ hardware options here.